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A Guide To Sympathy Flowers

Flowers are very special as they each symbolise a different emotion or meaning. Choosing the appropriate flowers can be an upsetting task, however, it can be a very useful part of the grieving process. Having a significant flower representing your loved one is a very traditional thing to do in the United Kingdom. This, however, does not make the choice any easier. South Wales Monuments have created a guide to help you choose the perfect flowers for your loved ones. If you would like any more information about South Wales Monuments services please visit our website today.

Roses

Roses

Roses are one of the most versatile flowers and are very interesting as each colour is known for having an individual meaning. White roses usually signify love and appreciation, dark crimson indicates sorrow and, signifies a strong tie or friendship, red roses signify love and pink roses are usually used to express thankfulness to the deceased. Roses are usually mixed with other flowers to create a beautiful arrangement.

Peace Lily Plant

Peace Lily Plant

Peace Lilies are representative of peace, harmony and innocence after death. The plant itself symbolizes innocence and rebirth of the departed’s soul from the world into a greater place. Christians view white peace lilies as a symbol of the Virgin Mary.

Chrysanthemums

Chrysanthemums

Chrysanthemums have different meanings all over the world. In Europe and America the main meaning behind them is sympathy and honour, however, in Asia, the meaning is completely different and these flowers symbolise rebirth and are used at baby showers instead of funerals. The colours play a role in the meaning too as red symbolises love and while symbolises innocence.

Orchids

Orchid

Orchids say, “I will always love you.” When you give an orchid plant as a gesture of sympathy it is important to consider the colour. Pink and white are the traditional colours of sympathy. Orchids are usually suggested by florists as appropriate plants for sympathy.

Carnations

Carnations

Carnations are the flower which you usually see in funeral wreaths. Each carnation colour has its own meaning for example red shows affection and white shows innocence. Talented florists usually use carnations to create beautiful arrangements for personalised tributes as well as many other events.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea

Hydrangea plants are usually used as a gift of thanks. They bloom for many many years and are very easy to maintain. This is why they can be a great gesture to send to a family. It is also known that these flowers symbolize true heartfelt emotions

Daffodils and Tulips

Daffodils and Tulips

Bright yellow spring tulips and daffodils are known for being a symbol of a fresh start and renewal. For this reason, they are used to bring encouragement and hope for a person who is grieving a loved one. Tulips represent grace and yellow tulips are known for representing cheerfulness.

Arrangements

Selecting a flower is the first step and then you must choose your arrangement preferences. The arrangement can help strengthen the message you want to share with your loved one. Similar to flowers, arrangements have their own traditions and meanings.

  • Floral Baskets – Floral baskets are usually displayed on top of tables or on the ground around the casket.
  • Inside Pieces – Inside pieces are placed inside the casket and are usually arranged in the corners as clusters, pillows, crosses or sheaves.
  • Casket Sprays – Casket sprays are placed directly on top of the casket and are used for closed casket serviced.
  • Standing Sprays – Standing sprays are displayed on an easel near the casket. They usually stand 1 to 3 feet high and are a noticeable feature at a funeral.
  • Wreaths – Wreaths are a circular shape which symbolises eternal life, they are usually placed on doors of funeral homes.

South Wales Monuments

Most florists will have the required skills and tools required to craft any design you wish to use to remember your loved one. If you would like any more information on sympathy flowers and their meanings please get in contact with South Wales Monuments today on 02920 887188.

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